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Exeter Labour Party supports Plastic Free Exeter's vision of a city free from single use plastics. 

Exeter Labour spokesperson Councillor Ollie Pearson said; "We have already supported initiatives, by Keep Britain Tidy's BeachCare programme and Plastic Free Exeter, to collect discarded plastics and recycle them at Exeter City Council's Materials Reclamation Facility (MRF)."

"We have also started looking at ways to end the use of single use plastics by Exeter City Council and will support the motion to be debated at the Council meeting on Tuesday 24th April."

Exeter Labour Party backs plastics campaign

Exeter Labour Party supports Plastic Free Exeter's vision of a city free from single use plastics.  Exeter Labour spokesperson Councillor Ollie Pearson said; "We have already supported initiatives, by Keep Britain... Read more

Exeter Labour Party are calling on Stagecoach to reverse their plans to drop the £1 child ‘add on’ bus fare. 

Stagecoach have announced that they are replacing the £1 child ‘add on’ with a £3 Child Dayrider, as well as increasing the Adult Dayrider from £3.90 to £4.

Labour calls on Stagecoach to drop child bus fare increases

Exeter Labour Party are calling on Stagecoach to reverse their plans to drop the £1 child ‘add on’ bus fare.  Stagecoach have announced that they are replacing the £1 child... Read more

Exeter Labour Manifesto 

Exeter City Council 2018-19 

 

Like the rest of the public sector, local authorities continue to face significant cuts to their funding thanks to ongoing Tory austerity.  In 2010/11, Exeter City Council received over £12million in revenue funding from the Government. By 2020/21 it will receive less than £5.5million. 

 

Exeter City Council has the 4th lowest district council tax in the country and receives less than £2.80 per household per week towards its services, which include a mixture of statutory and discretionary functions: 

 

  • Advice Services (including Housing & Benefits Advice) 
  • Communities (including Community Development, Facilities and Grants) 
  • Economic Development (including Business Support and Skills) 
  • Heritage, Culture & Arts (including RAMM, the Corn Exchange and Arts grants) 
  • Homelessness Support (including Outreach and Prevention) 
  • Parks & Open Spaces (including Play Areas, Valley Parks and Waterways) 
  • Regulatory Services (including Planning, Licensing and Environmental Health) 
  • Street Cleaning (including Graffiti, Fly Tipping and Dog Fouling) 
  • Tourism (including Visit Exeter and Tourist Information) 
  • Waste Collection (including Household Waste, Recycling, and Trade Waste) 

 

The City Council also has a capital budget, funded through money from developments, the sale of unneeded assets, and borrowing. This money can be used to invest in one-off capital projects, such as new buildings and major improvements to public spaces and community facilities, but cannot be used to support day-to-day services or general maintenance of facilities or public spaces. 

 

The City Council will need to make significant further savings between now and 2021. This will mean making very difficult decisions about services, while also finding funding to invest in public spaces, community facilities and housing. However, we also believe that Exeter City Council can and must do more, working with partners, to tackle some of the biggest challenges facing our city.

 

  • The Housing Challenge: build more affordable homes and create sustainable neighbourhoods. 
  • The Congestion Challenge: reduce congestion to improve air quality and access to education, jobs, services and leisure. 
  • The Healthy Communities Challenge: improve health outcomes and reduce health inequalities across our communities by increasing physical activity and reducing isolation. 

 

The Housing Challenge 

 

Under Labour, Exeter City Council has built dozens of new council houses since 2011 and has secured hundreds more social and affordable homes from developers through our planning policy, which is one of the strictest in the country.  

 

Social rented housing is let at the lowest rents by councils and housing associations to those who are most in need. A typical weekly rent for a 2-bedroom City Council flat is currently £75.85, which is 10% less than the equivalent housing association home and 55% less than the equivalent private rented home. 

 

Affordable rented housing is more expensive than social rented housing but less expensive than private rented. The Tory-Lib Dem Coalition defined ‘affordable rent’ as 80% of local market rates and restricted funding for new social-rented homes. As a result, the majority of local authorities no longer require developers to build any social-rented homes and only require them to build ‘affordable’ homes. 

 

Thanks to Labour, Exeter City Council was singled out for praise by the Homes and Communities Agency for protecting the delivery of new social housing. We require a quarter of all developments over 10 houses to be social-rented and a further 10% to be available for shared ownership. 

 

Exeter Labour Group remains committed to building more council homes and construction is currently underway on Chester Long Court; 26 high-quality, low energy council apartments for over 60s in Whipton.  

 

However, we face some big challenges. In 2016 the Tory Government imposed a council rent cut of 1% per year for four years. This saves City Council tenants less than £1 per week but slashed £8million from our budget for building new council houses. Finding funding to build more homes will therefore be one of our main priorities. 

 

The Congestion Challenge 

 

Congestion in Exeter is one of the most common issues raised by residents and businesses. As well as causing inconvenience, congestion makes buses less efficient, makes it more expensive for people to access work, education and other services, contributes to poor air quality in some parts of the city, and puts people off cycling due to safety concerns.  

 

Devon County Council is the highways and transport authority and has delivered some important infrastructure, such as the new stations at Newcourt and Cranbrook. However, they have been reluctant to commit to the kind of investment that Exeter really needs to reduce congestion. 

 

However, Exeter is already doing well compared to many other cities:*

  • The majority of Exeter residents (55%) do not drive to work 
  • Exeter has the 4th highest proportion of residents who walk to work (22%) 
  • Exeter has one of the highest proportions of residents who use public transport 
  • Exeter has good rates of cycling compared to similar cities, although still significantly less than Cambridge, Oxford and York. 
  • Contrary to perception, between 2005 and 2015 traffic levels were flat or fell on nearly all routes 
  • Air quality has improved significantly across the city, probably due to cleaner vehicles 

     *Data from Devon County Council  

 

So far Exeter has done reasonably well in limiting increases in car trips compared to population growth, however we will need to do much more to avoid future increases in traffic and will need big changes if we want to start reducing congestion, including new infrastructure, behavioural change, innovation and better partnership working.   

 

As Exeter City Council is not the transport authority, we cannot deliver many improvements on our own but we can work with Devon County Council and others and use our influence to put pressure on them to deliver the changes we need. 

 

The Healthy Communities Challenge 

 

We want all our communities to be healthy and happy. Despite having very low unemployment rates, some of Exeter’s neighbourhoods are in the most deprived 20% nationally, including parts of St Davids, Newtown, Wonford, Whipton and Beacon Heath. Exeter also has areas with a high risk of loneliness, even if they are not particularly deprived, including parts of Heavitree and Countess Wear. 

 

Residents in the most deprived areas have a life expectancy of five to ten years less than those in the least deprived areas and tend to experience chronic ill-health 10 to 15 years earlier. For example, a resident of Collins Road in Pennsylvania has a life expectancy of 89.5 years while a resident of Mount Pleasant has a life expectancy of 72 years. There is also a close link between deprivation and poor mental health. 

 

Increasing physical activity is now understood to be one of the key ways of improving a wide range of physical and mental health outcomes, and it can also play a big role in helping to build stronger communities and reduce loneliness. Under Labour, Exeter City Council committed to making Exeter the most active city in the South West and, by working with a wide range of partners including Active Devon, we achieved that goal in 2015. We are now committed to a longer-term goal to make Exeter the most active city in the country.  

 

Last year, Exeter was one of 12 places to win a share of £100million from Sport England to help people become more physically active. This money will make a major difference to improving physical activity in Exeter. The strength of existing partnerships and political leadership were among the reasons that the bid was successful, as well as the innovative work that the City Council is doing with Exeter City Futures and others.

Our Commitments 

We will continue our commitment to building new homes. 

We will lobby the Government to remove the unreasonable and illogical cap on borrowing for housing so that we can build more homes, more quickly. If the Government continues to ignore local councils, we will complete work on plans for a council-owned building company to build high quality homes for sale or rent and use the profits to build more affordable homes.  

We will continue to deliver the Joint Exeter and Teignbridge Homelessness Strategy to tackle rough sleeping and other forms of homelessness. 

We will prevent student development on council-owned land and review the student accommodation planning policy. 

We will propose, through our representatives on the Exeter Highways and Traffic Orders committee, a plan for improvements to pedestrian access at priority locations across the city and the adoption of a comprehensive cycle network plan for Exeter. 

We will continue to support the roll-out of the electric bike network through the Planning System and all other available means. 

We will invite local bus companies and other interested groups to work with us to design the best possible commercially viable network of bus routes that meets the needs of Exeter’s residents and commuters, using all available travel data.  

We will lobby Devon County Council to ask the Secretary of State for the power to franchise bus services, as allowed under Section 4 of the Bus Services Act 2017. This would allow Devon County Council to “Identify the local services that they consider appropriate to be provided in an area under local service contracts”. 

We will campaign for the Government to repeal Section 22 of the Bus Services Act 2017, which prohibits councils from setting up new bus companies. 

We will continue to support the delivery of the new Marsh Barton train station.  

We will continue to lobby for improvements to local, regional and intercity rail services as well as supporting the campaign for improvements to the Dawlish train line and for a new railway line to Plymouth and Cornwall. 

We will progress work on the new bus station. 

We will review Exeter City Council’s own Green Travel Plan and aim to become an exemplar in sustainable travel by 2020. 

We will continue to deliver the new Leisure Centre and produce a new investment plan to improve our other leisure centres, with a focus on the areas of highest need as part of our strategy to reduce health inequalities. 

We will offer free swimming lessons to all children before they finish primary school under the new leisure contract.  

We will increase investment in our play areas and work with children, young people and families to decide how the money is spent. 

We will use our multi-million pound Sport England funding to enable more people to live active lives in Exeter and reduce health inequalities by supporting those least likely to take part in physical activity. 

We will complete the Air Quality Action Plan consultation and implement the outcomes in the final plan. 

We will continue to invest in renewable energy, energy efficiency and recycling projects, to build on our success in reducing the City Council’s carbon footprint by a third since 2012. 

We will continue to work with Exeter City Futures and others to stimulate and support innovative solutions to Exeter’s biggest challenges. 

We will implement the Exeter Youth Strategy for a Young-People Friendly City, where young people’s views and heard and responded to. 

We will continue to invest in community development and community-led projects. 

We will continue to invest in arts and culture and recognise the benefits that they bring to our communities, economy, education and wellbeing. 

We will continue to support and expand the City Council’s apprenticeship programme introduced by Labour. 

We will continue to increase minimum staff pay in line with the Real Living Wage and will continue to lobby the Government for a fully-funded pay rise for local government employees. 

2018 Manifesto for Exeter City Council

Exeter Labour Manifesto  Exeter City Council 2018-19    Like the rest of the public sector, local authorities continue to face significant cuts to their funding thanks to ongoing Tory austerity.  In 2010/11,...

Exeter Labour Party can confirm that the plaque in memory of the murdered MP Jo Cox in Belmont Park has been found vandalised. The plaque was placed in September this year by the rose planted in memory of Jo Cox by volunteers. On the plaque, it displayed her statement that “we are far more united and have far more in common with each other than things that divides us”. The aim of the plaque was to ensure that the memory of Jo together with her kindness and compassion for people lives on. More in common as a statement is incredibly powerful because it reminds us of our shared values and provides an opportunity for everyone to work together to help others. As a local party we are determined to ensure we can remember the legacy of Jo by working to create a society where we work together in the community, provide opportunities and rights for everyone and stand for internationalism. The legacy of Jo lives on and it is very important for us to celebrate her life, her achievements and spread her message to build a better world for everyone.

Remembering Jo Cox by fundraising for a new plaque in Belmont Park

Exeter Labour Party can confirm that the plaque in memory of the murdered MP Jo Cox in Belmont Park has been found vandalised. The plaque was placed in September this... Read more

Labour run Exeter City Council have been working in partnership for several years now with the Devon Wildlife Trust on wildflower planting in Exeters parks, roundabouts and verges. The aim of the project is to attract wildlife into urban areas of Exeter but also to improve the appearance of Exeter roads, streets and parks. 
Stephen Brimble, Lead Councillor for Place on Exeter City Council says that "this is a brilliant project which shows that Exeter Labour values appearance and green space within communities in Exeter". The wildflowers on Prince Charles Road are one example of wildflowers planted throughout the city.
Initially starting as a local school project, the wild city concept has spread to 34 sites across Exeter this summer. There are plans to expand this to 60 sites in future years. Allowing wildflowers and meadows to grow is great for wildlife and the appearance of the streets, parks, roads and roundabouts but also reduces costs of maintenance in communities. 

Wildflowers Bloom Across Exeter

Labour run Exeter City Council have been working in partnership for several years now with the Devon Wildlife Trust on wildflower planting in Exeters parks, roundabouts and verges. The aim... Read more

Canvassing With Ben Bradshaw & Exeter Labour

Read more

Thank you to all of those who voted Labour on Thursday 8th June.  When Theresa May called this unnecessary and costly election it looked like Labour could be facing defeat in Exeter and across Britain.

The arrogant Tories campaign nationally was a disaster and Labour’s ran smoothly and boosted by a popular manifesto.

In Exeter we secured the highest percentage of the vote of any party in Exeter since 1923. Whilst nationally turnout was 68.7% in Exeter it was once higher at 71.7%. Over 34,000 people voted for us, more votes than we have ever achieved before and an incredible 62% of the vote.

The growing success of the Labour Party in Exeter continues, two years ago securing 30/39 seats on Exeter City Council, our largest majority ever and in May of this year securing 7 seats on Devon County Council under challenging boundaries.

Across Exeter we easily had over 350 volunteers helping just on Election Day itself. Since the campaign began there were far more than this, with people going out in the area of the city they live, coming to the office, traveling in from other areas of Devon and even coming from Taunton,  Bristol, Surrey, London and Glasgow.  It was everyone's efforts which made this huge triumph possible – I am sorry I will not be able to thank you all personally but know that whatever you did helped and is appreciated.

Without people doing all they could - be it displaying a garden stake or poster, donating what they could afford and offering time to help with tasks both in the office and out. People cancelled holidays, hardly saw their families and got very little sleep. This is what allowed us to achieve this fantastic result!

Thanks to the amazing efforts of our hundreds of volunteers we have had over 81,000 conversations with electors in Exeter since the last General Election and over 31,000 conversations with electors since 18th April 2017 when this election was called. This is an incredible achievement and allowed us to run an effective and winning campaign.

Ben Bradshaw re-elected as Exeter remains Labour - Thank You!

Thank you to all of those who voted Labour on Thursday 8th June.  When Theresa May called this unnecessary and costly election it looked like Labour could be facing defeat... Read more

As the 20th anniversary of Ben Bradshaw’s historic election victory in Exeter approaches, Ben has confirmed that he will fight his sixth General Election on 8th June following Theresa May’s announcement that she would go to the country early.

The popular Labour MP first won Exeter from the Tories in Labour’s landslide victory of 1997 and has held it ever since, most recently in 2015 when Ben trebled his majority.  Prior to this, Exeter only once had, briefly, a Labour MP.

Bob Foale, Chair of Exeter Labour Party said:

“We are absolutely delighted that Ben is standing again as Exeter’s Labour parliamentary candidate  – though it comes as no surprise given his tireless commitment to the people of Exeter and the local party.

Ben works incredibly hard for his constituents and is hugely respected.  His energy and passion are infectious and we know he will, as ever, be walking many miles around the streets and up and down the hills of Exeter over the next few weeks talking with residents and listening to their concerns.”

Ben Bradshaw said:

“The people of Exeter are being asked on June 8th to elect the person they want to be their local MP for the next five years. I hope they will back me, based on my record of hard work for Exeter, as the best person to represent them.  I am currently the only non-Conservative MP this side of Bristol and I believe it is important for the health of our democracy that we maintain at least one voice who will challenge the Conservative Government and fight for Exeter’s interests.  Given the opinion polls this will be an extremely close race and I and my local team hope to meet as many Exeter residents as possible over the next few weeks to listen and take on board their views and concerns.”

To get involved in Ben Bradshaw's campaign click here

Ben Bradshaw confirmed as Labour's parliamentary candidate for Exeter

As the 20th anniversary of Ben Bradshaw’s historic election victory in Exeter approaches, Ben has confirmed that he will fight his sixth General Election on 8th June following Theresa May’s announcement that... Read more

Allie and I set up our stall at the above event which was a second celebration of International Women's Day in Exeter.
This event was organised by Devon United Women and we attracted many of the women who attended to look at our brochures and display literature and sign our petition cards re protecting Women's Rights within the Brexit negotiations which will be sent to David Davies M.P.


We also joined up one new member and talked to many who stopped at the stall during the 5 hours we were there and were the only political party who participated in the event.


Many thanks to Rose and Lucy who also came to help run the stall.


Margaret Clark

Womens stall at Cultural Diversity event on 18/3 at Corn Exchange

Allie and I set up our stall at the above event which was a second celebration of International Women's Day in Exeter.This event was organised by Devon United Women and... Read more

Paul Bull was 'a quiet but solid champion of the Labour and Co-operative causes', says Luke Pollard, reflecting on the life of NEC member Paul Bull, who passed away on Sunday.

With his long hair and ever-present bum bag Paul Bull looked an unlikely role model. A Plymouth Argyle supporter living in Exeter, he managed to combine a passion for Devon’s two competing cities with ease. A champion of co-operative values, Paul served our party in various capacities but most recently as the South West’s Co-operative Party NEC delegate. His death leaves us poorer as a region and as a movement.

News of his passing has hit us hard in the south west because Paul was one of those people you simply couldn’t imagine not being there. The ever-present smiling gent, encouraging and supportive, he will be remembered not just as a good, decent man, but as someone who campaigned for and represented his community and his beliefs with true humility and passion.

From the doorstep canvassing sessions in Cowick and St Thomas, the communities he represented in Exeter, to election battles across the region, Paul was a quiet but solid champion of the Labour and Co-operative causes. The lead for communities and culture on Exeter City Council, he managed to promote his city, his ward and his values effortlessly and simultaneously. 

The memories and tributes shared online since the news of his death both from friends in the Labour and co-operative movement and our political opponents speak to a man held in high regard by all those who met. A kind patient man, Paul was rarely rushed, taking time to speak to and understand all those around him.

His participation in local groups, in co-operatives, the Exeter Pound local currency and community causes marked him out as one of the co-op movement’s heroes: quietly and passionately getting on with the task of making the world a better place one person at a time, giving everyone the time they deserved and each cause the attention it deserved. Whether you knew Paul or not, we all know someone like Paul. He was the type of person valued by all those around him.

Everyone active in our movement in the Westcountry will recognise his encouragement and support at meetings, the fabled South West Weekend School in Torquay and on the streets. Paul represented the very best of our movement: calm, considered and considerate and willing to stand up to be counted. 

Paul was a one off, but there’s someone like Paul in all our communities getting on with it without fanfare or ceremony. I wish I had had the chance to say these words to him because he deserved our thanks for all his efforts for our party and movement. For the Paul in your party and your community please do not leave it until they pass to say how much we value them and what they do for us all. 

Paul Bull passed away after a battle with cancer on Sunday evening with his wife Rachel at his side. He was taken from us at the age of 60, far too early. Our thoughts are with Rachel, and comrades and co-operators in Exeter Labour and the South West Co-operative Party. 

Remembering Cllr Paul Bull

Paul Bull was 'a quiet but solid champion of the Labour and Co-operative causes', says Luke Pollard, reflecting on the life of NEC member Paul Bull, who passed away on... Read more

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